Ask Your Coach: Right-Sized E-Coaching Services

Sandra The Peoples Coach Rev 2


Why do people and teams hire coaches? Because they want to get better and win!


Shine Crossings offers an “email” and “small call” service that gives you access to an experienced coach when you need it most. Perfect for when you want a different perspective, bounce ideas off a professional, brainstorm options, and come up with your next steps in conversation with a trusted partner.

Do you have an issue in one or more of these areas: (1) managing teams, direct reports, and your boss, (2) job and career, (3) leadership, (4) financial decisions, (5) sales, (6) relationships and marriage, and (7) business strategy. You can get these services by enrolling in the “Ask Your Coach” monthly subscription, which gives you up to 60 minutes of email and call time. Think 15 to 30-minute calls a few times a month.

The introductory price for this new service is $99/month. Have a coach at your fingertips. The outcome of one coaching conversation can influence the success of your next decision. If you’d like to learn more, check out the FAQs. If you’d like to subscribe, reach out to me at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or 281.793.3741.


Ask Your Coach FAQs

  1. How do your coaching services work?

With your paid monthly subscription, you get up to 60 minutes of call or email time per month to use in whatever way you need. Get perspective, ideas, and recommendations on topics covering leadership, team building, job, career, finances, relationships, parenting, and marriage. The only area that I don’t coach on is health, fitness, and wellness.

  1. How do I contact you to use the services?

You can either send me an email with your question or topic and let me know whether you want an email response or call.  You can also text me to set up a mutually agreed to time to talk. My time to provide feedback to your email question or with you on a call counts toward your coaching subscription time.

  1. Are our written and verbal conversations confidential?

Yes. If you want to subscribe, you will be emailed a simple contract that provides me with your contact information, addresses confidentiality between us, and outlines the fee structure. Once we both sign the contract, we can begin your coaching.

  1. How do I pay?

Three days before the start of your monthly subscription, you will receive a PayPal invoice to your email account. Simply pay the invoice by credit card and you’re set for the month. You will be put on an automatic monthly invoicing schedule with no credit card on file. When you no longer want the services, don’t pay the invoice.

  1. Is there a minimum monthly commitment?

No. It’s a pay as you go plan, one month at a time.

  1. What happens if I decide I want more coaching services than 60 minutes per month?

We’ll have a conversation to determine your needs and adjust your plan. If the email/short call structure works for you, and you want access to more minutes, we’ll adjust the monthly subscription price. If you want to focus in depth on a specific issue, we can set up a face-to-face or video call to do a deep dive. Regular coaching services are billed at a minimum of 1 hour and prorated for additional minutes.

  1. How easy is it to get a hold of you when I need you for coaching?

For short calls, I try to schedule our call to take place within 36 hours of your contact. For emails, I usually respond in less than 24 hours. If I’m unavailable due to a vacation or business schedule, I notify subscriptions holders by email with blackout dates in advance.

  1. If I have further questions or want to enroll, what is my next step?

Send me an email at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or give me a call or text to 281.793.3741

How to Get Your Life Priorities in Order

Sandra The Peoples Coach Rev 1

Client Question

I’m feeling overwhelmed, because I’m pulled in so many directions. It seems like I can’t please anyone or myself.  How do you suggest I start taking back control of my life?

Sandra’s Response

Americans are probably one of the most over-scheduled societies in the world. In my experience, over-crammed lives usually result in lower general life satisfaction because what’s most important is diluted by having too many things competing for limited time. People lead integrated lives, so the best approach in addressing your problem is to evaluate it using a multi-dimensional model, because changes in one life area will certainly impact others.  For instance, if you focus on changing careers or jobs and need to put extra time into the new position to be successful, you’ll likely have to spend less time with family or a favorite hobby.

A life coach can help you identify, assess, and understand how all areas of your life are working together and how to mitigate the natural tensions and challenges of leading a prioritized, well-balanced life. I’d first recommend completing the Wheel of Life to gauge your satisfaction with each life area. A coach can next help you create a vision for each area and understand how all the pieces work together for and against each other. You can then make intentional decisions on priorities and learn to eliminate or release those things that are holding you back from having your most fulfilling life.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and life coaching.  She coaches individuals and couples as well as designs and facilitates workshops.  She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra by visiting her website at www.shinecrossingsministry.com. If you would like to engage Sandra as your coach or ask a question, you can send her a message to shinecrossings@gmail.com

How to Control Spending While Living on a Budget

Sandra The Peoples Coach Rev 1

Client Question

I’m living on a budget and struggling with how to stick with my monthly allowance for dining out and entertainment. Do you have any suggestions on how I can improve my discipline in these areas?

Sandra’s Response

Living on a budget for the first time can be both uncomfortable and rewarding. Budgets can make people feel uneasy, because they typically require people to change behaviors and make sacrifices to meet long-term goals. On the positive side, budgets can be rewarding when you see your bank account grow and your money go toward your defined priorities and dreams. I congratulate you for living on a budget, because statistics show that only 1/3 of households have a budget with even fewer consistently adhering to it.

It’s not surprising that you have a few categories where you struggle with discipline. Dining out and entertainment, those fun and make-it-easy-on-your-lifestyle categories, are common ones. For these two categories, I’d suggest taking the full monthly allowance out in cash on the first of each month and putting each in its own envelope to carry with you. Use only cash for these categories, so you can visually see how much you have remaining as the month progresses. Statistics show people spend upwards of 20% more when using a credit or debit card than they do handing out bills to pay for their purchases.

If you decide to adhere to this envelope methodology, it’s also a good idea to write on the outside of the envelope any dining out and entertainment plans of which you’re already aware. Paperclip the cash for these plans together in your envelope, so you don’t spend it prematurely and get caught short.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and life coaching.  She coaches individuals and couples as well as designs and facilitates workshops.  She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra by visiting her website at and www.shinecrossings.com and www.shinecrossingsministry.com. If you would like to engage Sandra as your coach, reach out to her at shinecrossings@gmail.com

What is Coaching? Answer: Getting Results!

ashley-batz-betmVWGYcLY-unsplashYou’ve probably heard of coaching for actors (1940’s), sports athletes (1960’s), and business executives (1990’s), but your understanding of life coaching may be more ambiguous. Despite life coaching being a practiced discipline since the 1800’s, the profession remains relatively misunderstood with people even associating coaching with counseling. With those assumptions, people conclude they don’t need a life coach.


Not everyone needs a counselor, but everyone can benefit from a coach.


Throw the mentoring in the mix, and the differentiation gets muddier. Although coaching, counseling, and mentoring all serve to help people, each has a different function, process, and relationship.

Coaching: Not Counseling or Mentoring

Professional coaching, mentoring, and counseling share a similar purpose in helping people through life seasons and transitions. How to achieve a better work-life balance? Struggling in a marriage? About to get married? Trying to figure out which career path to take? How to land the next promotion? The situational factors will determine what professional and which approach best serves the client.

In general, coaches use relational influence to develop and empower people, mentors impart their wisdom upon less experienced individuals, and counselors diagnose their clients’ problems and offer solutions. Coaching differs from mentoring and counseling on many levels, including the participant’s role.

Although coaches are change experts, they believe their clients are the experts of their lives. Coaches typically work with mindset and help clients take responsibility to act in ways that maximize outcomes. Coaches and clients are equal partners, who co-construct the coaching relationship through vulnerable and empowering conversation.

Coaches can administer assessments, sometimes suggest, and lead with challenging and powerful questions, so clients can then decide on specific plans to achieve their defined goals. On the other hand, mentors and counselors are the experts in the relationship, who offer advice and make suggestions. Stoltzfus (2005) found that when people solve their own problems versus being told what to do, they learn more and are more motivated to address problems and implement their identified solutions.

Coaching also differs from counseling in that it is future-oriented as opposed to focusing on the past. Mentoring may alternate between both realms. Collins (2009) defines coaching as enabling people to move from where they stand to a position of where they want to be. Coaching and mentoring are grounded in the present with the desire to help others grow personally, develop skills, or acquire knowledge, as opposed to counseling, which typically involves exploring past hurts to achieve healing.

Coaching and mentoring differ in their approach, although over the years the practical application of mentoring has expanded, so it appears more like coaching. Mentors are typically subject-matter experts in their fields who provide information, support, correction, and accountability to develop their mentorees.

Christian Life Coaching

Those who may understand the value of life coaching may not necessarily understand the difference when the label of Christian is applied. Christian life coaching differs from its secular counterpart with the operating foundation of a Christ-based worldview that encourages clients to find God’s vision and purpose for their lives. The Christian Life Coach helps to guide the client from where they stand to where God wants them to be, and secular coaching supports client in pursuing their own human-based goals (Collin, 2009).

Many Christian life coaches successfully coach secular-based clients, because one of the many ethical standards held by coaches is not to impose their own beliefs onto their clients. Coaching is not about the coach but helping clients achieve want they want for their lives.

Coaching Benefits

Coaching sessions have an agenda, defined goals, and accountability, which is not inherently part of the counseling or mentoring process. Coaching provides a supportive relationship and structure that allows the client to take responsibility and be held accountable to make life changes.

Through assessments and skilled questions, a coach unlocks the confidence and commitment in their clients to define goals and achieve results. A coach will partner with you, encourage you, help you see what motivates you, believe in you to make change and challenge your thinking.

Coaches typically provide written action plans and follow-up with their clients between sessions. Coaching can be done over the phone, video conferencing, and face-to-face. Coaching is for anyone who strives to be a better version of themselves in any area of life, and successful coaching is measured solely by the client achieving results.

References

Collins, G. R. (2009). Christian Coaching: Helping Others Turn Potential into Reality. (2nd ed.). Colorado Springs, CO: NavPress.

Stoltzfus, T. (2005). Leadership Coaching: The Disciplines, Skills and Heart of a Christian Coach. Virginia Beach, VA: Booksurge Publishing.


144-2 - CopyAbout the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach and consultant with an extensive background in business development, leadership, and ministry which provide her with the experience, relational skills, and proven processes to move individuals, couples, and leaders to higher levels of personal awareness, effectiveness, and goal achievement. She coaches in a variety of areas including life purpose/plans, business, leadership, finances, and premarital/marriage.