Do You Have a 100% Responsibility Mindset?

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Responsibility is a term we use frequently throughout our home, work, and leisure lives. Generally speaking, responsible means to have or accept the duty to deal with something or someone. I would assume no one would disagree that we shouldn’t be responsible, and some would probably agree they could act more responsible. Yet, how do you know how responsible you really are?

I like to measure responsibility on a continuum, because as with any attribute or behavior, we don’t have enough focus and energy to be hitting on all cylinders all of the time. Most people struggle with the responsibility they have, yet haven’t thought about what it means to have a responsibility mindset—taking full responsibility for their life and results. Depending on what the world has thrown into their lives that day, people move back and forth on a responsibility mindset continuum.

luis-villasmil-mlVbMbxfWI4-unsplashHowever, it’s important to understand what a 10 on a scale of 1 to 10 might look like if you were to achieve a 100% responsibility mindset. You wouldn’t blame, criticize, or even complain. Why? Because when you do, you’re ultimately saying there’s something you know is better that you’re not willing to go after.

Some people incessantly complain about their job but don’t make an effort to even update their resume and look for another one. Spouses complain about their other half but won’t even suggest marriage counseling. Still others complain about their mother-in-law, and yet never take a constructive step to work on the relationship.

When you have a 100% responsibility mindset, you don’t blame, criticize, or complain, because you know you’ve done everything within your control to influence or go get it, and there’s nothing more left for you to do. You then release it as your burden.

You’re probably thinking now of the last thing you criticized or person you blamed. Let the concept sink in. Awareness is the first step in moving towards a 100% responsibility mindset. If you’re unhappy with a relationship or situation, ask yourself, “How am I creating it, promoting it, or allowing it to continue.” Answering this question will give you greater insight into how you might adopt a 100% responsibility mindset, improve your circumstances, and eventually move toward emotional freedom.

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About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional life coach with an extensive background in leadership and business consulting. She has a passion to help people be the hero of their own life stories. She administers assessments, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

Resilience: Adopt a Squirrel Mindset

toimetaja-tolkeburoo-qyt0cPByJjs-unsplashIf your personal resilience could be characterized by an animal, what animal would you be? Would you’d be the stereotypical male lion, who waits for his pride to bring him what he needs and would likely starve to death, if not for the hunting skills of the lionesses. Or perhaps you’re more like a gecko, who detaches its tail when grabbed by a predator, runs, and then grows it back within weeks. I’d like to think that my personal resilience is more like the common backyard animal—the squirrel.

Think of a world of humans having the personal resilience of squirrel. Their mindsets should be admired, because squirrels routinely demonstrate the following behaviors:

  1. Plan for Adversity: How many times have you watched a squirrel from your window digging hole after hole after hole in your yard? He’s digging and burying nuts for winter. Adversity will come when the snow covers the ground, and the food supply disappears. He can’t necessarily count on the goodwill of humans to fill those bird feeders in the winter. And speaking of bird feeders…
  2. Never Give Up: If you’ve had the time, you’ve likely watched a squirrel tirelessly try to get bird seed out of a feeder that was booby-trapped with all types of supposed squirrel-proof gadgets. Having watched dozens of videos of human inventors proved wrong, I don’t think there’s a truly squirrel proof bird feeder yet.
  3. Don’t Complain: Paired with the never-give-up attitude, you don’t hear squirrels complaining when the game gets rough and goes on and on. They adopt a 100% responsibility mindset: 100% responsible for getting that seed. However, that doesn’t mean they don’t seek the help of their friends. In fact, once a winning formula is discovered, squirrels share the good news.
  4. Tap into Creativity: Have you seen some of the contorted positions squirrels eat from as they hang onto the bird feeders? If not, google photos. It makes extreme yoga look like the Special Olympics.
  5. Refrain from Discouragement: Discouragement doesn’t appear to be in a squirrel’s vocabulary. After applying the “never give up” resilience approach, they’re usually able to crack the code and come away with a full belly. When people say no to the squirrel and up their design, the squirrel responds, “Not now.”

anthony-intraversato-pT_wQgZAIU8-unsplashPeople can learn from the behaviors of squirrels. They have an incredible amount of resilience which probably explains why we see more than we care to in our own yards. What mindset area could you work on improving that would help you become more resilient?


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional life coach with an extensive background in leadership and business consulting. She has a passion to help people be the hero of their own life stories. She administers assessments, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

 

COVID-19: What have you learned? What will you change? How can I help?

damir-spanic-cMe5lwooOig-unsplashCOVID-19 has been a kick in the butt for many businesses. Some are not sure if they will make it. Others have tightened down the hatches and believe they can ride out the storm. Others are actively pursuing new opportunities to thrive on the other side. Remember the old saying: “Never let a crisis go to waste.”

Whether it’s survive or thrive, every company should ask where they rank on the continuum of flexible versus agile. What’s the difference? Flexibility means adapting to circumstances beyond your control. On the other hand, companies who are agile proactively change to take advantage of opportunities on the other side.  Where is your company on the continuum of flexible versus agile?

If you’re not sure, I have a few questions that can start the conversation:

  1. Describe what the new normal looks like on the other side of COVID for your industry and market?
  2. Based on your answer to the first question, what changes do you need to make now to set you up for success for the new normal?

As an example, some businesses believe virtual meetings will be a greater part of the new normal. How well do your people communicate in the virtual realm? Communicating virtually has specific nuances you need to be aware of and manage to ensure that it’s as powerful in person as it is across a computer connection. Communication is 55% body language, 38% tone of voice, and 7% words. How you set up your environment for a visual call can also makes a huge difference in how you’re perceived. Do your people know what changes they need to make to shine?

Leadership coaching and consulting can help prepare your team to be the best version of themselves for the new normal. Let’s have a conversation on what post-COVID might look like for your business, so we can set you and your team up for success.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and business consulting. She administers DISC® and Myers-Briggs/MBTI® testing, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

 

How to Create Your 10-Year Vision

matt-noble-BpTMNN9JSmQ-unsplashWhat’s your thought when someone says, “I have a 10-year vision?” Would it be (1) Wow! (2) How do you do that? (3) Not for me, or perhaps (4) I wouldn’t know where to start. The truth is that if you don’t have a vision on where you’re headed, the current of daily life will take you wherever it meanders. Where will that be? Who knows? Yet, many people regret not being more intentional with their lives as evidenced by many deathbeds regrets.

Don’t let regret be a major theme of your later years. Set a vision toward where you want to go or what you want to do. Know that the daily pressures of life will at times push you off your path. That’s to be expected, but when you know the direction you’re headed, you can pivot and get back on the path. A vision doesn’t have to be accomplished in 1 year or even 5 years. Some visions can take 10 years or longer to achieve.

Below is my recipe for how to step forward into a 10-year vision. I give a name to each year which represents the focus for that year. Replace it with a word of your own if it has more meaning for you. The name is there to remind and motivate you until you reach your destination. Twenty-twenty is the perfect year to start your 10-year vision. Think of Vision 2020 as the decade challenge in achieving something bigger than you ever imagined.

Year 1: EXPERIMENT and say “yes” to the new

This is the year to say “yes” to meeting new people, trying new things, having different conversations, and creating new experiences. Be open to new world perspectives and thinking. Challenge your long-held beliefs and assumptions that might be holding you back from achieving more and walking in your purpose.

Year 2: Define and describe your VISION

With consideration of your last year of experiments and new experiences, write down a vision of where you want to be in 10 years. What are you doing? Describe the world around you. Write down a strategy, tactical plans, and a budget to get there. Break your vision into 3 big moves or steps. Each step may include one or multiple activities.

Year 3: Forge PARTNERSHIPS

Most people can’t reach their 10-year vision without some help from others. You may need expertise, financial backing, additional hands/feet on the ground, or emotional support. Identify and build relationships that will help you reach your vision.

Year 4: PREPARE yourself

What do you need to do to prepare yourself for a big move? Do you need to improve your health, land a certain job, reconcile certain relationships, or live within a budget? Get ready to move and press forward.

Year 5: Step FORWARD into your first big move

Big, big move! Press into the vision. Does that mean relocating, downsizing, or buying something? This is where fear and cold feet can enter the picture. Up until this point, visioning was more a paper exercise or fit into your daily life. Don’t stop now. You are making change toward something you’ve dreamed about.

Year 6: SOLIDIFY the foundation

Operate and settle into the new platform on which you are standing. Get comfortable with being uncomfortable, because there will be more of it. You’re building resilience.

Year 7: REST

Review all that has happened. Has anything changed with regards to your vision? What adjustments do you need to make? Recharge your batteries, because it’s time to press on.

Year 8: ONWARD

Take a second big step toward your vision. It’s getting real. This second step should feel uncomfortable again. You have the confidence from your first successful move to know that if you can dream it, you can achieve it.

Year 9: PUSH

Push forward. Take another step onward. By now putting one foot in front of the other is feeling more comfortable. You should have reached your vision.

Year 10: CELEBRATE

Take time to enjoy what you’ve accomplished, how you’ve grown, and start dreaming of your next big vision.

clark-tibbs-oqStl2L5oxI-unsplashSome might say that taking 10 years to reach a vision is too long. Others may think 10 years is too short. Work the steps at the pace you feel comfortable. These steps are just a way to take the concept of visioning and making it more manageable and less intimidating for those who become overwhelmed with the thought of visioning.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and business consulting. She administers Myers-Briggs/MBTI® testing, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

What’s Your Listening Score?

mimi-thian-lp1AKIUV3yo-unsplashListening is a powerful communication skill that affects your leadership influence and relationships. When you listen well, people notice. Why? Because most people don’t practice good listening. Instead, they typically focus on being heard.

Ribbers and Waringa (2015) define seven levels of listening which are:

  1. Continually interrupts people, impatient when listening, wants to hear him- or herself talk, doesn’t get to the point easily
  2. Restrains him- or herself enough to listen but with visible signs of impatience, prefers to talk about own experiences
  3. Listens to others, polite and observes standard conversational etiquette, reactive conversational partner, doesn’t actively draw out others to talk
  4. Lets others talk, asks for clarifications, prefers to keep conversations about business
  5. Always takes the time to willingly listen, comes across as interested in the other person, gives appropriate feedback
  6. Gets people talking, exchanges information, listens well to others while giving natural responses, asks questions to get to the heart of the subject
  7. Expresses sensitivity to the needs of others, makes time for people, asks questions to clarify, gives feedback, shows involvement

We can’t always listen at a level seven, and frankly, not all conversations require a seven. However, we should be holistically aware of where we tend to operate and decide whether we need to focus on improving our listening skill. These listening definitions can also help us identify which conversations require which level of listening in order to improve the outcome for both speaker and listener. With a defined scale as reference, it’s easier to target and measure improvement.

Reference

Ribbers, A., & Waringa, A. (2015). E-Coaching: Theory and Practice for a New Online Approach to Coaching. New York, NY: Routledge.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and business consulting. She administers DISC® and Myers-Briggs/MBTI® testing, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

E-Coaching: A Powerful Coaching Option

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Technology now allows us to write and send messages more efficiently and at our own comfortable pace. Gone are the days of conversation delays via trans-Atlantic letters and the Pony Express (a.k.a. snail mail). Because we can communicate in writing over the internet/SMS, e-coaching (e-mail/electronic coaching) was born and continues to grow in popularity.

E vs. Face-to-face Coaching

Coaching is a powerful process that can be delivered in many ways: face-to-face, video, telephone call, and through e-mail. Coaching has evolved with technology, and this has been to the benefit of the client. Some people like e-coaching more than face-to-face.

My clients enjoy e-coaching, because it allows them to deal with bite-size issues that fit with their personal situations better than the longer face-to-face sessions. They may be actively working toward their goals and only need to connect with a coach to bounce off an idea, brainstorm, or get a different perspective.

E-coaching can be just as effective, if not more than face-to-face coaching, because it allows clients the time and space to reflect, think, and consider their response. For people who have a preference toward introversion and a need for more self-reflection and introspection, e-coaching can feel more powerful, giving them a greater sense of control during the coaching process. If you’d like to learn more about your personal preferences toward intro- versus extroversion, read more about the Myers-Briggs.

Future of E-Coaching

E-coaching will continue to evolve with companies eager to apply its concepts on multiple fronts. Woosh5 incorporates e-coaching as an option to its resilience survey and platform of exercises. Shine Crossings offers a monthly subscription service that combines e-mail/small-call coaching on any topic a client needs help. Although face-to-face may continue to be the mainstream mode of coaching, e-coaching has a growing role in the coaching industry and may be the main catalyst for its growth.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and business consulting. She administers DISC® and Myers-Briggs/MBTI® testing, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

Diversity & Inclusion: More Than a Women’s Movement

you-x-ventures-4-iZ147pSAE-unsplashFairness, justice, and opportunities for all are values that I believe resonate in the hearts of most people regardless of their profession. Aren’t these some of the founding principles upon which America was built? Unfortunately, despite the best intentions, life is not fair, never was, and likely never will be, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t keep striving to make those values come alive in our businesses. Who isn’t inspired to support women who want to put their passion, skills, and talents to work in industries primarily served by men? I don’t think many would disagree that it’s only fair to afford women these opportunities.

Although we may agree on what the vision should look like, we may have different ideas on the best way to bring that ideal to fruition. Media, journals, conferences, and LinkedIn are aflutter with talk about Diversity and Inclusions (D&I) with named women’s groups promoted as the steps toward bringing awareness and action. These women’s initiatives are started by both industry societies and individual companies who are trying to support women.

As I wrote in What Role Do Men Have in Women’s Movements, any women’s initiative in a male-led industry that excludes men risks underserving its mission by eventually becoming a social outlet versus a sustainable empowering program. Why? Because when one sex holds the power, there are only two ways that power can be distributed: (1) those in power willingly sharing it and (2) the underserved taking it forcefully through legislation, guilt, bribery, or punishment.

Feminism, Affirmative Action, and the Me Too initiatives were all social and/or legislated initiatives that used some level of force to change the relationships between men and women. Although these approaches had positive outcomes, they also created unintended consequences such as resentment, fear, hiding, and hoarding, and are not fully sustainable when the applied pressure is released. A more sustainable approach to equalizing power is to encourage men to voluntarily share it.

I readily admit that we live in a world where many people are working towards accumulating power, so why would they give it away? Because some men are not primarily motivated by power and are willing to spread it around. How can this be achieved? By inviting men to participate in the process. Not only will men help build momentum, they’ll be able to help work through the guaranteed roadblocks.

My recommendation to women’s groups, who are trying to promote women in male-dominated industries, is to carefully think about strategy. Men don’t necessarily want to give support to a small defined cause, they prefer to donate their time, money, and influence to win a movement. Men want to get behind a vision that is bigger than themselves. As a business strategist, I would minimize any labels that make it appear as a women’s only initiative and give it a bigger appeal that would naturally be more inviting to men.

Putting energy into promoting a label of “diversity and inclusion” appeals to men, because it implies they are part of its movement. Men need to be included in the group for it to be diversified. Ask for their direct participation to help create more opportunities for women. Men will feel more comfortable claiming they are part of a “diversity and inclusion” movement versus a “women’s” movement.

In the end, aren’t women seeking a business environment that reflects diversity and inclusion? If this is true, call it that from the start. You may be thinking, “you say po-ta-toe, and I say po-tot-o, but it’s the same thing.” At its core, the objectives are the same, but a movement needs a good cause as well as a good marketing plan to engage the audience and get them to say yes. Don’t underestimate the power of marketing to advance women in traditionally male-led industries such as chemicals, oil & gas, high tech, and security.

Would love to hear comments from both men and women on this approach to a very current hot topic.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and business consulting. She administers DISC® and Myers-Briggs/MBTI® testing, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

 

Ask Your Coach: Right-Sized E-Coaching Services

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Why do people and teams hire coaches? Because they want to get better and win!


Shine Crossings offers an “email” and “small call” service that gives you access to an experienced coach when you need it most. Perfect for when you want a different perspective, bounce ideas off a professional, brainstorm options, and come up with your next steps in conversation with a trusted partner.

Do you have an issue in one or more of these areas: (1) managing teams, direct reports, and your boss, (2) job and career, (3) leadership, (4) financial decisions, (5) sales, (6) relationships and marriage, and (7) business strategy. You can get these services by enrolling in the “Ask Your Coach” monthly subscription, which gives you up to 60 minutes of email and call time. Think 15 to 30-minute calls a few times a month.

The introductory price for this new service is $97/month. Have a coach at your fingertips. The outcome of one coaching conversation can influence the success of your next decision. If you’d like to learn more, check out the FAQs. If you’d like to subscribe, reach out to me at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or 281.793.3741.


Ask Your Coach FAQs

  1. How do your coaching services work?

With your paid monthly subscription, you get up to 60 minutes of call or email time per month to use in whatever way you need. Get perspective, ideas, and recommendations on topics covering leadership, team building, job, career, finances, relationships, parenting, and marriage. The only area that I don’t coach on is health, fitness, and wellness.

  1. How do I contact you to use the services?

You can either send me an email with your question or topic and let me know whether you want an email response or call.  You can also text me to set up a mutually agreed to time to talk. My time to provide feedback to your email question or with you on a call counts toward your coaching subscription time.

  1. Are our written and verbal conversations confidential?

Yes. If you want to subscribe, you will be emailed a simple contract that provides me with your contact information, addresses confidentiality between us, and outlines the fee structure. Once we both sign the contract, we can begin your coaching.

  1. How do I pay?

Two days before the start of your monthly subscription, you will receive a PayPal invoice to your email account. Simply pay the invoice by credit card and you’re set for the month. You will be put on an automatic monthly invoicing schedule with no credit card on file. When you no longer want the services, don’t pay the invoice.

  1. Is there a minimum monthly commitment?

No. It is a pay as you go plan, one month at a time.

  1. What happens if I decide I want more coaching services than 60 minutes per month?

We’ll have a conversation to determine your needs and adjust your plan. If the email/short call structure works for you, and you want access to more minutes, we’ll adjust the monthly subscription price. If you want to focus in depth on a specific issue, we can set up a face-to-face or video call to do a deep dive. Regular coaching services are billed at a minimum of 1 hour and prorated for additional minutes.

  1. How easy is it to get a hold of you when I need you for coaching?

For short calls, I try to schedule our call to take place within 48 hours of your contact. For emails, I usually respond in less than 48 hours. If I’m unavailable due to a vacation or business schedule, I notify subscriptions holders by email with blackout dates in advance.

  1. If I have further questions or want to enroll, what is my next step?

Send me an email at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or give me a call or text to 281.793.3741

The Power of Cognitive Diversity to Solve Problems

cognitive diversity

Inclusion & Diversity is a hot topic in today’s business environment that holds the underlying belief that diversity will result in better decisions and outcome. The inherent thinking is that diversity, as embraced in the components of age, gender, and ethnicity, will provide different perspectives, points of view, and approaches that will enhance a company’s ability to solve problems and grow. The concept sounds logical, but surprisingly, research doesn’t support that differences in age, gender, and ethnicity, by itself, contribute to higher team performance. Reynolds and Lewis (2017) found that demographic diversity had no correlation with team performance.

The research found that the highest performing teams had diversity in perspectives and methods of processing information when working with new, uncertain, and complex problems (Reynolds & Lewis, 2017). Referred to as Cognitive Diversity, what the best performing teams had in common were the: (1) ability to leverage existing and generate new knowledge and (2) preference to use their own expertise and put into effect the know-how and ideas of others.

There’s a high positive correlation of cognitive diversity with performance, which is independent of education, culture, and other social conditioning (Reynolds & Lewis, 2017). A person’s cognitive approach is an internal trait that’s hard to identify in the hiring process, so companies typically focus on other attributes. Unfortunately, people have a tendency to bring others aboard who think and express themselves the same way as they do. It’s also not uncommon for those who think and reason differently than the prevailing culture to suppress their different ways of looking at things in order to fit in and be part of the team.

Successful companies encourage cognitive diversity by making it safe for their employees to express their natural cognitive tendencies and authentic selves. With authenticity and leadership as two of my top five core values, I truly believe that servant leaders lead with authenticity and help others lead with theirs as well.

Reference

Reynolds, A., Lewis, D. (2017). Team Solves Problems Faster When They’re More Cognitively Diverse. Harvard Business Review


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and business consulting. She administers DISC® and Myers-Briggs/MBTI® testing, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

 

What’s Your Definition of Success?

core values

In our success-stressed and driven world, there’s hot debate on what is success and what does it looks like. In my conversations I get a variety of answers, but most have a common theme that involves material status, possessions, wealth, or some form of recognized achievement. So, what’s your definition of success?

I’ve come to realize that I don’t share the same world view of success as most people. Although status, wealth, and fame can certainly be part of an equation for personal success, I believe they may be part of the reward but not the definition. I cross paths with many people living successful lives without those tangible results.

Each of us has an identity created by our faith, talents, strengths, and purpose. Some people take longer than others to figure out those areas of life and usually learn from mistakes made along the way. Pain can certainly become a platform for success. I believe people achieve life success when they remain true to themselves and continually live out their top five core values.

Your core values are the center of your being and define who you are and what you stand for. When you aren’t able to live out your core values, you may become frustrated, angry, depressed, and disillusioned, even if you have wealth, fame, or status. How many times have you heard someone who appears to have everything say:

  • Is this it? How come I don’t feel happy?
  • I thought I would feel happier.
  • That’s it? I still feel like something is still missing in my life.

When people are able to structure their lives around their core values, they tend to flourish and feel fulfilled.

My top five core values are leadership, authenticity, service, love, and obedience, which explains much of what and why I feel as I do. Although I love to lead, I don’t have to and can easily follow. However, I recently experienced how conflict with my leadership value created an overwhelming degree of frustration that most people wouldn’t have felt. Because of my gifts of administration, I gladly organize most mission trips. However, when I agreed to join another team, I became incredibly frustrated with its poor leadership throughout the entire process. I realized that if I wasn’t allowed to lead, I had to ensure that my core value of leadership was honored by only joining a team that was led well.

I propose that success has nothing to do with what you have but instead living a life that allows you to express your core values on a daily basis. Living out these values doesn’t necessarily mean you will have money or fame. My daughter is an animal advocate, dog foster, vet technician, and runs a non-profit dog rescue. I don’t know what her future holds, but I don’t imagine she will assess huge wealth. I consider her successful, because she’s living out her passion and core values. So, I ask again, how do you define personal success?


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and business coaching. She administers DISC® and Myers-Briggs/MBTI® testing, designs and facilitates workshops, and coaches both individuals and teams. She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by reaching out to her at coach.sandra.dillon@gmail.com or by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com