Increase Your ROI with These Trust Behaviors

Sandra Dillon: April 17, 2018


Trust 1

The Composition of Trust

Trust: Do You Have It and How to Build It described how our intimacy level is correlated to the amount of trust operating in our personal relationships. In his study of workplace relationships, Covey (2006) asserts that trust is built by employees operating with integrity and ability. Subsequently, a high level of workplace trust favorably impacts the bottom-line.

Trust is a function of both character and competency working together. Have you worked with people who you could share your life stories with but who couldn’t get the job done right? What about the co-workers who could always deliver a flawless product or proposal but always trash-talked people behind their backs? How would you rate each of these colleagues on the continuum of trust? You may classify each as untrustworthy but have a preference on who you would choose to work with based on whether you placed more value on character or competency.

The Impact of Trust

When you hire and cultivate people who embody both character and competency, you have a winning formula to beat the competition, because your organization has trust flowing through its culture. Covey (2006) proposes that when trust is high, speed is high, and cost is low, with mistrust doubling the cost of doing business.  The trust formula:

(Strategy x Execution) Trust = Results

Trust becomes the multiplier for strategy and execution and reflects what we see, speak, and behave in the workplace. Increasing profits to the bottom line doesn’t have to involve another product launch or acquisition. Just increasing trust delivers increased profits. When employees trust one another, they don’t have to recover from missed deliverables, double check work for mistakes, and waste time with cover-your-ass tactics.

The two questions every employee from the C-Suite to the factory floor should ask themselves if they want to increase trust are:

  • What level of trust am I operating at?
  • How can I push the trust multiplier higher?

How to Increase Trust

If you’re wondering how you can increase bottom line results, Covey (2006) recommends 13 key behaviors that can push your trust factor higher.

  • Talk straight: tell the truth, let people know where you stand, and don’t manipulate people or facts
  • Demonstrate respect: show genuine care for others, treat people and their roles with dignity, and show kindness
  • Create transparency: share information that people can verify, be open and authentic, and don’t have hidden agendas or hide information
  • Right wrongs: don’t cover things up, apologize quickly, make restitution when possible, and demonstrate humility
  • Show loyalty: acknowledge contributions of others, don’t bad-mouth others behind their back, and don’t disclose personal information
  • Deliver results: establish a track record of making things happen, get the right things done, be on time and within budget, and don’t over-promise and under-deliver
  • Get better: be a constant learner, develop feedback systems, and thank people for their feedback while acting on it
  • Confront Reality: take on issues head-on, address the tough stuff directly, lead out courageously in conversation, and don’t skirt real issues
  • Clarify expectations: disclose, discuss, validate, and renegotiate expectations if needed
  • Practice accountability: take responsibility for results, be clear on how you’ll communicate progress, and don’t blame others when things go wrong
  • Listen first: listen before speaking to understand, don’t presume you have all the answers, and listen with your ears, eyes, and heart to find out what is most important to the people you’re working with
  • Keep commitments: say and do what you commit to, make commitments carefully, and don’t break confidences
  • Extend trust: extend trust appropriately based on the situation, risk, and credibility of the people involve, extend trust abundantly to those who have earned it, and trust conditionally to those who are earning it

I suggest rating yourself on a scale of 1-10 on how well you demonstrate the 13 key behaviors of trust. For those 2-3 behaviors where you scored the lowest, identify some specific changes you can make that would drive that behavior higher on the trust scale.  Monitor your progress and see how your colleagues respond to you.

Reference

Covey, S. (2006). The Speed of Trust: The One Thing That Changes Everything. New York, NY: CoveyLink.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and premarital/marriage coaching.  She coaches individuals and couples as well as designs and facilitates workshops.  She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves.  You can learn more about Sandra or engage her as your coach by visiting her website at www.shinecrossings.com

How to Get Your Life Priorities in Order

Sandra The Peoples Coach Rev 1

Client Question

I’m feeling overwhelmed, because I’m pulled in so many directions. It seems like I can’t please anyone or myself.  How do you suggest I start taking back control of my life?

Sandra’s Response

Americans are probably one of the most over-scheduled societies in the world. In my experience, over-crammed lives usually result in lower general life satisfaction because what’s most important is diluted by having too many things competing for limited time. People lead integrated lives, so the best approach in addressing your problem is to evaluate it using a multi-dimensional model, because changes in one life area will certainly impact others.  For instance, if you focus on changing careers or jobs and need to put extra time into the new position to be successful, you’ll likely have to spend less time with family or a favorite hobby.

A life coach can help you identify, assess, and understand how all areas of your life are working together and how to mitigate the natural tensions and challenges of leading a prioritized, well-balanced life. I’d first recommend completing the Wheel of Life to gauge your satisfaction with each life area. A coach can next help you create a vision for each area and understand how all the pieces work together for and against each other. You can then make intentional decisions on priorities and learn to eliminate or release those things that are holding you back from having your most fulfilling life.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and life coaching.  She coaches individuals and couples as well as designs and facilitates workshops.  She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra by visiting her website at www.shinecrossingsministry.com. If you would like to engage Sandra as your coach or ask a question, you can send her a message to shinecrossings@gmail.com

How to Control Spending While Living on a Budget

Sandra The Peoples Coach Rev 1

Client Question

I’m living on a budget and struggling with how to stick with my monthly allowance for dining out and entertainment. Do you have any suggestions on how I can improve my discipline in these areas?

Sandra’s Response

Living on a budget for the first time can be both uncomfortable and rewarding. Budgets can make people feel uneasy, because they typically require people to change behaviors and make sacrifices to meet long-term goals. On the positive side, budgets can be rewarding when you see your bank account grow and your money go toward your defined priorities and dreams. I congratulate you for living on a budget, because statistics show that only 1/3 of households have a budget with even fewer consistently adhering to it.

It’s not surprising that you have a few categories where you struggle with discipline. Dining out and entertainment, those fun and make-it-easy-on-your-lifestyle categories, are common ones. For these two categories, I’d suggest taking the full monthly allowance out in cash on the first of each month and putting each in its own envelope to carry with you. Use only cash for these categories, so you can visually see how much you have remaining as the month progresses. Statistics show people spend upwards of 20% more when using a credit or debit card than they do handing out bills to pay for their purchases.

If you decide to adhere to this envelope methodology, it’s also a good idea to write on the outside of the envelope any dining out and entertainment plans of which you’re already aware. Paperclip the cash for these plans together in your envelope, so you don’t spend it prematurely and get caught short.


About the Author: Sandra Dillon is a professional coach with an extensive background in leadership and life coaching.  She coaches individuals and couples as well as designs and facilitates workshops.  She has a passion to help people be the best versions of themselves. You can learn more about Sandra by visiting her website at and www.shinecrossings.com and www.shinecrossingsministry.com. If you would like to engage Sandra as your coach, reach out to her at shinecrossings@gmail.com